Setup And Access Your Webmail

Written by BWG on . Posted in Email Support

Webmail is a great feature offered by Boston Web Group via your cPanel hosting account. You can access email from any PC connected to the Internet. There are two ways to log into webmail supplied with cPanel.

Access webmail through cPanel (Administrator Access Only)
Access webmail via direct link. (For Email Users) (directions below)


Access Webmail via Direct Link

To access the webmail directly, type the following information into the browser.

If the domain name has propagated type:

http://www.yourdomainname.com/webmail

Substitute your primary domain or an addon domain name for yourdomainname.com.

or

http://webmail.yourdomainname.com

Substitute your primary domain name where it says yourdomainname.com in the examples. This method does not work for addon domains.

You can also access it by going through the default webmail port number of 2095 as in the following example.

If the domain has propagated type:

http://www.yourdomainname.com:2095

Once you go to the address above, you will be prompted for your user name and password. Be aware, it is not asking you for your cPanel user name and password. All email account user names look just like the email address.

Please note that the login name and password are case-sensitive, and must appear as they display in your control panel.

In the user name section, type your full e-mail address (example: [email protected]). In the password section, provide the password which you provided when you created the email account. Then hit enter. You are now logged into webmail!

Are you able to receive emails but not send?

If you aren’t able to send email, this usually means one thing… your internet provider is blocking you from using anyone’s outgoing mail servers but their own. Many major internet service providers (ISPs) block outgoing emails to prevent their internet connection from being used for spam. In order to work around this issue, we have opened Port 26. Please change the outgoing mail server (SMTP) from the default Port 25 to Port 26.

If you use Outlook, please be sure to select the option for “Outgoing SMTP Server Requires Authentication”. This is now required for our server security.

What if both Port 25 and Port 26 don’t work?

Some ISPs block both ports, and you will need to follow your ISP’s procedures for sending email. You will typically have one or two choices. Sometimes you may contact your ISP to request that they open port 25, and they will do this for you, although many ISPs have begun declining to do so. Some ISPs may require you to use their SMTP servers for all outgoing mail, so that they can monitor outgoing email on their network in order to prevent spam.

You’ll want to contact your ISP about which SMTP servers you should use for outgoing email. This information is usually posted on a page of their website. If they have a search box on their site, searching for “port 25” will usually lead you to the relevant pages.

You may still send email as being from your domain (i.e. [email protected]); it just needs to be routed through their SMTP servers.

But my mail used to work.

Sometimes ISPs change their policies and start implementing blocks to certain ports without informing their customers (other than perhaps a post on their website). Most ISPs post information about Port 25 on their website if they have implemented a policy of blocking it. If sending mail suddenly stops working, this is probably why.